Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Tubac,Tucson, Art and Friends

We have moved to Tucson where we will be until after the Escapade in March. We have never stayed here and are looking forward to exploring the area and seeing friends who are here or just passing through. 
Allan and Sharon were in Tucson for the opening of an art show they were participating in so we spent most of the first weekend with them. We also drove to Tubac, a funky little artist community between Tuscon and Mexico. 
In Tubac we explored a few shops and galleries. The Center of Arts had a special exhibit of the works of Monica Warhol, cousin of Pittsburgh's Andy Warhol.
Interesting jack rabbit outside the center.
There were several shops selling outdoor decor.
One of the real adobe homes in the old part of town. These old buildings had authentic mud bricks and walls and on those that have not been maintained, the covering on the walls has eroded exposing the bricks. 
The only thing left of the original presidio is the outline of the walls. Even though Tubac is in the desert they get enough rain that old adobe structures have melted away over the years. 
Just south of Tubac is Tumacacori National Historical Park. This is the oldest European settlement in Arizona. It was the site of a native American village when Spanish Padre Kino arrived and established the mission. The mission changed over the years because of rebellions by the native people and changes made by the Spanish king.
Allan and Sharon at the mission. This building replaced an earlier smaller mission around 1800. It was never completed after Mexico became a country and forced all Spanish residents out.
The altar of the mission.
In 1767 King Charles III of Spain removed the Jesuits because of rumors that they were becoming wealthy and powerful.  He replaced them with Franciscans. They continued to struggle with Apache raids and by 1787 the mission was abandon until around 1800 when the present mission was started.
The art show opening Allan and Sharon were here for was at the Desert Museum. Because we were their guests we had free admission to the museum, good news.  Unfortunately the weather did not cooperate, bad news, so we only saw a small part of the museum. The hummingbird aviary was very neat.
Up close with another hummingbird. It is wonderful to be able to get so close to these beautiful little wonders.
Allan and Sharon with their pastel paintings. She did the kayaker and he did the mission. Pastels have been their retirement passion and we love seeing how much they have improved each time we see them.
The Arizona Pastel Artists Association artists who had paintings in the show. It runs until April 17 so if you are at the Desert Museum don't miss these wonderful desert themed works.  It's really worth a visit.
Sharon, who is the president of the association, participated in the ribbon cutting ceremony. The reception was great and we loved seeing all the art by many artists we have seen on earlier visits to the Southwest.  
Another day we went to old town Tucson, the site of the original city. All the buildings here must keep their old appearance. Unlike many old adobe buildings we have seen, most in old town are painted in bright colors. A walk around old town is a step back in time.
While in old town El Charro is not to be missed. It is the oldest Mexican Restaurant run by the same family since 1922. It is the Arizona restaurant on a list of the one place in each state that should be on your dining list. We had a great time exploring the area with Allan and Sharon, who once lived here, and were great tour guides.
We put out the word when we got to Tucson for any friends passing through to give us a shout. We got a call from Carl and Vickie whom we met at Betty's RV Park three years ago. We had a great lunch at El Charro while getting caught up with all our travels. Seeing friends on the road is one of the greatest things about our lifestyle.

2 comments:

Jan Mains said...

Looking forward to seeing you in a couple of weeks.

Doing It On the Road(Part II) said...

Nice bird pics. and others of course.